By CASEY WATTS

A Western Michigan University School of Music professor grew up surrounded by a very different approach to gun laws.

A Western Michigan University School of Music professor grew up surrounded by a very different approach to gun laws.

Growing up in the former Soviet Union where the police carried cigarettes instead of guns in their holsters because they thought society was safe enough to not need a weapon shaped a Western Michigan University School of Music professor’s belief that firearms should be prohibited.

Igor Fedotov’s childhood was spent in the Soviet Union in the 1960s. During that time, no one accept governemnt authorities could carry guns. Many policemen felt guns were unnecessary to carry, he said. The ban stayed until the 1990s. Now, Russia has gun control laws very similar to the United States and citizens are legally able to purchase a firearm.

When he grew up, homicide was very uncommon. But it is not that way today, he explained.

“Russians have an expression. When people get really upset at somebody, you often could hear someone saying a private conversation ‘I wish I had a gun,’” he said.

The expression does not mean to promote violence, but is instead said as the highest degree of disappointment, Fedotov explained.

“It is in the human nature if you have a gun you will use it. If a person doesn’t, he might just say the phrase,” he said. “And I prefer to use the phrase as a last point instead of violence.”

 

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